Hubert Burda Media

OCTOBER ISSUE

Sometimes, it feels good to be bad. And so we thought a lot about renegades this issue – the rule-breakers and change-makers that have shaped the world into what it is today.
We started with this month's cover star, Rose McGowan, who made he

OCTOBER ISSUE

Sometimes, it feels good to be bad. And so we thought a lot about renegades this issue – the rule-breakers and change-makers that have shaped the world into what it is today.
We started with this month's cover star, Rose McGowan, who made headlines recently for sharing on Twitter an audition casting note that requested female candidates show up with cleavage on display – and was promptly fired by her agent for her temerity. The actress, who at one point in her life and of her own free will would wear a lot less than the directive demanded, and on the red carpet, no less, has thus emerged as a leading voice speaking out against female stereotypes in Hollywood. Her frank and compelling interview – one of the best we've had in recent memory – begins on page 170.
The world of fashion, of course, is also known for its enfants terribles, and we've got exclusives with two very different ones. Fitting in the mould of classic bad boy is Marc Jacobs, who's learning to market his off-kilter sensibility to the luxury market ahead of a much-rumoured IPO (page 144). Then there's Federico Marchetti, who may be one of the fiercest forces in fashion today, but 15 years ago was just a crazy Italian guy who thought he could convince people to buy luxury goods over the internet. His tale is told on page 182.
If you think about it, deviants have always made for pioneering trailblazers. Dismantling a television set and calling it art, the late Nam June Paik gave rise to a whole new genre of creative expression, unwittingly becoming the forefather of video art. His exhibition at Gagosian Gallery is definitely worth a visit, as is our preview of it on page 192. And just as architects are developing and overdeveloping every inch of every city, the green-haired, green-thumbed Patrick Blanc is doing the opposite, bringing nature back to metropolises via his vertical verdure installations (page 196).
We encourage you to take inspiration from each one of these nonconformists, whether it's the beauty mavens who asked men of God to make creams (page 164), the petrolhead given free rein to skid an Audi across a frozen lake (page 200), or the Japanese chef who's dispensed with the term “pop-up” to host “guerrilla restaurants” around the world (page 214).
We at Prestige Hong Kong certainly agree that rules are made to be broken. And there's no better way to do so than by giving that smartphone a rest and perusing a print magazine like ours. Not that we're telling you what to do, of course.

Christina Ko

Editorial Director

Magazine edition: 201510

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