Hubert Burda Media

5 Not-to-be-missed Art Exhibitions

Culture-vultures: Be sure to include at least one of these blockbuster art events in your itinerary this summer holiday season.

1  David Hockney: A Matter of Perspective

STPI Gallery, Singapore

David Hockney, Afternoon Swimming 1980, Lithograph (© David Hockney / Tyler Graphics Ltd.; Photo Credit: Richard Schmidt)

David Hockney, Afternoon Swimming 1980, Lithograph (© David Hockney / Tyler Graphics Ltd.; Photo Credit: Richard Schmidt)

STPI Gallery is staging a solo showcase of Britain’s most celebrated living artist known for his broad oeuvre, ranging from Yorkshire landscapes and Los Angeles swimming pools to digital sketches. While major institutions — Britain’s Tate Modern, Centre Pompidou in Paris and the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York —  also celebrate Hockney’s 80th birthday this year with retrospectives, STPI refreshingly casts the spotlight specifically on his experiments with perspectives. Drawn primarily from the Singapore Art Museum Collection, the 36 selected works employ multiple vanishing points to make the viewer a part of the art rather than a mere onlooker. The exhibition runs till September 9, 2017, with guided tours available every Tuesday (11.30am), Thursday (11.30am) and Saturday (2pm).

2  Carolee Schneemann: Kinetic Painting

Museum für Moderne Kunst (MMK), Frankfurt am Main

Carolee Schneemann, Eye Body: 36 Transformative Actions for Camera 1963

Carolee Schneemann, Eye Body: 36 Transformative Actions for Camera 1963

Find out more about the doyenne of feminist art, Carolee Schneemann at the MMK, which presents a comprehensive retrospective of her six-decade practice until September 24, 2017. Awarded the Golden Lion for Lifetime Achievement at the Venice Biennale in May, the American is one of the most important figures in the development of performance and body art, whose style is described by the Biennale as “direct, sexual, liberating and autobiographical.” Her works at the MMK range from rarely seen paintings from the 1950s to her“kinetic theatre” performances, experimental films and contemporary installations. Among the 270 strong collection are Eye Body: 36 Transformative Actions for Camera (1963), in which she melds her body into an environment, and Meat Joy (1964), her pioneering feminist performance work. Do note, parental guidance is recommended for young visitors.

3 Raphael: The Drawings

Ashmolean Museum, Oxford

Massacre of the Innocents (c) Trustees of the British Museum

Massacre of the Innocents (c) Trustees of the British Museum

Hailed by the Financial Times as a “once-in-a-generation opportunity” and The Guardian as “mind-opening”, the Ashmolean’s staging of 120 drawings by the Renaissance star reveal an intimate and tender side to the artist known for his many paintings of Madonna and Child. Taken from across Raphael’s (1483–1520) brief but brilliant career, they trace his creative years in Florence to the height of his career working on the Vatican Frescoes. “The idea of eloquence runs through the exhibition, not only in the shaping of Raphael’s powerful visual language but also in the tactile and gestural qualitiesof the drawings and in their expressive power — aspects that also make the drawings ‘speak’ in arresting ways to viewers today,” says curator Dr Catherine Whistler. Due to overwhelming popularity, be sure to book your tickets early. The exhibition ends on September 3, 2017.

4  Gauguin: Artist as Alchemist

Art Institute of Chicago

Paul Gauguin. Vase in the Form of Leda and the Swan, 1887–1888. Private collection.

Paul Gauguin. Vase in the Form of Leda and the Swan, 1887–1888. Private collection.

Moving beyond the controversies of Paul Gauguin’s (1848–1903) personal life and work as a painter — notably his over exoticised paintings of women in idyllic Tahitian settings — Gauguin: Artist as Alchemist instead explores the Frenchman’s all-consuming interest in the applied arts. The exhibition, which runs till September 10, 2017, brings together some 270 works from his experimental oeuvre, ranging from ceramics, woodcarvings and prints to furniture. This largest ever presentation of his work marks the first time many of these objects have been reunited since leaving his studio. Extending the experience of the exhibition beyond the galleries, the Art Institute has also enlisted designer Anna Sui to design a scarf, sarong, tote and lipstick case inspired by the exhibition and available exclusively at the museum shop.

5  Art Stage Jakarta

Sheraton Grand Jakarta Gandaria City Hotel

Jimmy ONG, Study Lovers Rock, 2015, Charcoal and gouache on paper, FOST Gallery

Jimmy ONG, Study Lovers Rock, 2015, Charcoal and gouache on paper, FOST Gallery

Returning for its second edition from August 11-13, 2017 , the fair is touted as the world’s largest platform to discover and engage with Indonesia’s artists, collectors and galleries, bridging the global art world with Southeast Asia’s most dynamic art scene. Up to 20 Indonesian galleries are expected to participate in the fair — including Nadi Gallery, Semarang Gallery and ROH Projects — as well as more than 30 leading international galleries such as Tokyo’s Mizuma Gallery, Gajah Gallery from Singapore and Sydney’s Sullivan+Strumpf.